Last edited by Basida
Friday, October 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of guide to flammable products and ignition sources for adult consumers found in the catalog.

guide to flammable products and ignition sources for adult consumers

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

guide to flammable products and ignition sources for adult consumers

by U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

  • 13 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Consummer Product Safety Commission : for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fires -- Safety measures,
  • Flammable materials -- Fires and fire prevention,
  • Combustion,
  • Consumers

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesHap & hazard series, an ounce of prevention
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 17 p. :
    Number of Pages17
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14946857M

    A material’s auto ignition or ignition temperature is the temperature at which a material self-ignites without any obvious sources of ignition, such as a spark or flame. Most common flammable and combustible liquids have auto ignition temperatures in the range of °C (°F) to °C (°F). Get this from a library! A guide to flammable products and ignition sources for elementary schools.. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.].

    A flammable liquid in its liquid state will not burn. It only will ignite when it vaporizes into a gaseous state. All flammable liquids give off vapors that can ignite and burn when an ignition source such as a lighted cigarette or spark is present. To understand the dangers associated with flammable liquids, it is. INTRODUCTION: YOUR GUIDE TO HANDLING FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS SAFELY Except in rare cases of natural catastrophes, every fire is preventable. That’s why there’s RedBook. Inside you’ll find explanations of the equipment and methods you can use to help minimize the chance of fires caused or spread by ignition of flammable and combustible liquids.

    A material's autoignition or ignition temperature is the temperature at which a material self-ignites without any obvious sources of ignition, such as a spark or flame. Most common flammable and combustible liquids have autoignition temperatures in the range of °C (°F) to °C (°F). Some have very low autoignition temperatures. Sources of ignition. Category 1 or 2 flammable liquids, or Category 3 flammable liquids with a flashpoint below °F ( °C), shall not be handled, drawn, or dispensed where flammable vapors may reach a source of ignition. Smoking shall be prohibited except in designated localities.


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Guide to flammable products and ignition sources for adult consumers by U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Download PDF EPUB FB2

Guide to flammable products and ignition sources for adult consummers. Washington: Consummer Product Safety Commission: For sale by the Supt.

of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off., (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: U.S.

Consumer Product Safety Commission. A guide to flammable products and ignition sources for adult consummers. By U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Abstract. Mode of access: Internet Combustion., Flammable materials, Author: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

This guide is intended as a resource manual and activity source book for secondary school teachers, librarians, administrators, curriculum planners, and teacher educators for teaching proper methods for selecting, using, maintaining, and disposing of flammable products and ignition sources.

Particular emphasis is placed on methods for including product safety instruction in the liberal arts. Sources of Ignition: Flammability Characteristics of Chemicals and Products electrical electrostatic charge energy at C ether Ethylene glycol Ethyl Ethylene glycol exothermic explosion occurred flame Flammable limits flammable Spontaneously flammable flange Flash point friction spark gases gasoline Hazards heat histories of ignition hot.

Guidelines for Determining the Probability of Ignition of a Released Flammable Mass - Kindle edition by CCPS (Center for Chemical Process Safety). Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Guidelines for Determining the Probability of Ignition of a Released Flammable by: 1.

Sources of Ignition: Flammability Characteristics of Chemicals and Products describes the flammability characteristics of substances and deals with the different sources of ignition.

Case histories are presented for review and analysis. The book is comprised of six chapters and seven appendices. This guide is intended as a resource manual and activity sourcebook for elementary school teachers, librarians, administrators, curriculum planners, and teacher educators for teaching proper methods for selecting, using, maintaining, and disposing of flammable products and ignition sources.

Basic product safety messages are developed for matches, space heaters, fabrics, extension and appliance. The tool, when populated with appropriate data, yields an estimate of the probability that a defined release of a flammable material will ignite if exposed to an ignition source.

This information can be used to make risk assessments with a higher degree of confidence than estimates made before and it provides valuable information for use in the.

• Appropriate materials selection and control of flammable materials is an important element of NASA’s approach to fire control • Major lesson learned from the Apollo fire in was ignition sources can be minimized but never completely eliminated • Spacecraft fire control is based on minimizing potential ignition sources.

The Consumer Product Safety Program administers and enforces the CCPSA and the regulations made under it. Enforcement actions taken by Product Safety Officers on noncompliant products depend on the degree of hazard associated with noncompliance, and include commitment to product correction by industry, negotiation with industry for the voluntary removal of these products from the market.

Let’s begin with a quick list of the different types of ignition sources to help you identify the ignition and fire hazards at your own worksite. Possible ignition sources include: Matches, cigarettes, cigarette lighters, flames, blow torches, gas appliances and heaters.

Welding and flame cutting equipment. Control Ignition Sources: It is important to control or eliminate all potential ignition sources in areas that might contain an accumulation of vapors.

Following are some of the precautions that should be taken to minimize the probability of ignition: Electrical equipment and wiring should be suitable for the hazard. Complemented by an estimating tool spreadsheet based on a fixed set of chemicals to assist in risk estimations, Probability of Ignition of a Released Flammable Mass converts a best guess to a calculated value based on available information and current technology.

The text documents and explains the science and background of the technology-based approach. The tool, when populated with.

PN Version 3 last updated January – A guide for flammable and combustible liquids under the WHS Act Page 3 of 18 Introduction The Queensland Work Health and Safety Act (WHS Act) regulates the storage, handling and use of hazardous chemicals and major hazard facilities. A person conducting a.

Flash point is the lowest temperature at which sufficient vapors from a liquid are present that the air/vapor mixture will ignite when exposed to an ignition source.

A product with a flash point near or below degrees F is particularly dangerous because exposure to any ignition source, such as a spark from static electricity or a burning cigarette, may set off a fire or explosion. Fuel — Fuels are flammable or combustible materials and can be gases, liquids or solids.

Heat — These are ignition sources and include an open flame, lit cigarette and sparks (such as from electrical current and static electricity shorts). A chemical reaction that creates heat can also ignite a. For a flammable or combustible liquid fire to start, a mixture of vapour and air must be ignited.

There are many possible ignition sources: Sparks from electrical tools and equipment. Sparks, arcs and hot metal surfaces from welding and cutting. Tobacco smoking. Your Guide to the Safe Handling of Flammable Liquids. These rags used with flammable liquids present a different disposal problem because they are susceptible to ignition from outside sources — heat build-up in accumulated oily wastes can cause spontaneous ignition.

He is a veteran of successful industrial and consumer products. mufflers, also can be ignition sources. Fuel sources include combustible materials, such as wood, paper, trash and clothing; flammable liquids, such as gasoline or solvents; and flammable gases, such as propane or natural gas.

Oxygen in the fire triangle comes from the air in the atmosphere. Air. in the presence of an ignition source. Hot surfaces11 and electrical arcs, such as those present at the contacts of electrical switching contacts (switches, temperature and humidity controls, etc.), are the principle potential ignition sources in HVAC and appliances.

The same concerns hold true for other flammable refrigerants, as well. Identifying Ignition Sources Once fuel and oxygen are present, an ignition source is needed to complete the fire triangle. Hydrocarbons can be ignited in two ways: • When an external ignition source with sufficient energy to ignite the fuel-oxygen mixture is available (e.g., flames, sparks).Keeps the most dangerously flammable textile products and garments out of the marketplace.

Part - Scope. 5 Wearing Apparel: The Standard applies to all textiles used for adult and children’s wearing removed from a small, open-flame ignition source.The Flammable Fabrics Act (available in PDF and Text), was passed in to regulate the manufacture of highly flammable clothing, such as brushed rayon sweaters and children's cowboy chaps.

The Flammable Fabrics Act of originally placed enforcement authority with the Federal Trade Commission.